Vine Video Sharing

vineVine is for video sharing, and the app works best on a mobile phone. Techies in the Twitter universe conceived and developed the app, and a user is supposed to be age 13 or older. Once a person sets up Vine on a mobile device, he or she creates and shares short videos with followers or the general public.

Vine Explore

The explore window features the post trending hashtags.

Just  as Twitter limits contributions to 140 characters, Vine videos also reflect this short and succinct philosophy, so a user is limited to six second clips. Videos can be organized and tagged with hashtags so it’s easy to search for a topic. Vine even has a blog on its site.

Author’s Note: I do not have an account. Instead I explored Vine with a friend who is an accomplished user.

A big reason that Instagram (owned by Facebook) added videos to its app features this year is because Vine (owned by Twitter) quickly grew into a strong social media competitor. A TechCrunch post, Instagram Video vs. Vine: What’s the Difference, offers some other comparative information. Read last year’s class-on-a-blog post about Instagram, Getting to Know Instagram and Getting Adults Up to Speed.

Two Quotes from the Vine Terms of Service Continue reading

Info on Kids’ Video Resources and More

Larry's WorldTwenty-first Century parents are continually on the lookout for resources that help them understand more about the digital lives of their children. Learning more about quality video resources for kids is a priority.

One of my favorite online locations – where parents can find information about technology, digital common sense, and what’s happening in general in the digital world — is Larry’s World, a web site maintained by Larry Magid, who I’ve been following for years. A seasoned journalist who frequently contributes to the New York Times and was, for 18 years, a syndicated columnist for the Los Angeles Times, Magid is also the author of a number of books on social media, online safety, and the Internet. His articles and content, always with a strong educational subtext, are also published at CNET, the San Jose Mercury News, and Forbes (among others).

Over dinner recently the parents of a young child spoke about the challenge of moving from the old-fashioned world of a VCR-DVD player and cable into the to the era of streaming video.      Continue reading

Word Order When You Search — It Matters!

The word order of a search matters in today’s connected world, so 21st Century learners — of all ages — should understand how search results change when a user rearranges the words. A short video on word order, uploaded by Google’s Search Anthropologist Daniel Russell – check out his Search-Research blog – teaches this lesson effectively.

Use this less-than-two-minute video, recently featured in a blog post at Free Technology for Teachers, as a quick and succinct teaching tool with students, parents, and other educators.

Introduction to Digital Footprints Via Google Dashboard

dashboard footprintSo many of our daily activities leave multiple digital footprints, little records of our work and whereabouts. At a time when privacy is taken less seriously and more and more people make copies of what we do and say — whether friends or in some official capacity — digital footprints multiply quickly.

Phones, utilities, credit card purchases, cars, movie downloads, online purchases, and all of our social networking activities leave little bits of code — each recording some aspect of our activities. Many of these digital footprints are fairly obvious parts of daily life, easily accessible to us. Others, however, come from our association with people and web locations  – site registrations, tagged digital photos, and comments we leave here and there. Sometimes we don’t even think much about signing up for a site —  we just log in and then rarely use it again. We create a slew of less obvious digital and supposedly confidential footprints via our medical and bank records,and social security — in theory more private.

Check out this digital dossier video from Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

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YouTube: Quick Support for Parents

YouTube Safety Mode

Click to view Google’s YouTube  safety mode video.

Last week an acquaintance asked me how a parent can insulate digital children, at least a bit, from some of the more inappropriate content that YouTube may present to kids. My friend had just finished the February 2013 Washington Post article, Kids Are Three Clicks Away from Adult Content on YouTube.

Like so much in the social media world, YouTube is fun to use and filled with amazing and seemingly unlimited content, and it offers massive resources for 21st Century learners and their parents. Lots of YouTube help material is available on the web, but the best guides are parents and teachers who are also confident and knowledgeable users. The trick is for you to learn to use YouTube well and model your skills with your children.

But good help documents are available.      Continue reading