Beloit College Class of 2018 Mindset List Is Out

The Mindset authors talk about the lists.

Want to learn a bit about the 21st Century students who are entering college right now and infer a bit about digital kids at other ages? Check out this year’s Beloit College Mindset list for the class of 2018. This yearly list helps adults — parents and educators — recognize just how much our cultural frames of reference differ from those of our digital-age children, even if they may be younger than college freshmen.

Started in 1998 by two faculty members at Beloit, the list was originally created as a way for faculty and staff at the college to learn more about how easy it is for adults talk about things that they take for granted but that their students don’t know.  The website includes links to past years’ lists.

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Back-to-School Digital Life Conversation Starters

b8dbf690fa0c8bea11_ahm6b34k7Check out an interesting graphic filled with back-to-school digital life conversation starters over at the Platform for Good website. You can also download a PDF with a larger image to post at home near a work area or on the refrigerator.

August and September are good months to think about family digital citizenship issues. Ask yourself and your kids questions such as:

  • How can we balance screen time with outside time?
  • How can we model best practices for one another?
  • How can we keep track of our digital footprints and our digital reputations?
  • Should we use one of the many digital contracts and agreements in our family?

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Vine Video Sharing

vineVine is for video sharing, and the app works best on a mobile phone. Techies in the Twitter universe conceived and developed the app, and a user is supposed to be age 13 or older. Once a person sets up Vine on a mobile device, he or she creates and shares short videos with followers or the general public.

Vine Explore

The explore window features the post trending hashtags.

Just  as Twitter limits contributions to 140 characters, Vine videos also reflect this short and succinct philosophy, so a user is limited to six second clips. Videos can be organized and tagged with hashtags so it’s easy to search for a topic. Vine even has a blog on its site.

Author’s Note: I do not have an account. Instead I explored Vine with a friend who is an accomplished user.

A big reason that Instagram (owned by Facebook) added videos to its app features this year is because Vine (owned by Twitter) quickly grew into a strong social media competitor. A TechCrunch post, Instagram Video vs. Vine: What’s the Difference, offers some other comparative information. Read last year’s class-on-a-blog post about Instagram, Getting to Know Instagram and Getting Adults Up to Speed.

Two Quotes from the Vine Terms of Service Continue reading

Info on Kids’ Video Resources and More

Larry's WorldTwenty-first Century parents are continually on the lookout for resources that help them understand more about the digital lives of their children. Learning more about quality video resources for kids is a priority.

One of my favorite online locations — where parents can find information about technology, digital common sense, and what’s happening in general in the digital world — is Larry’s World, a web site maintained by Larry Magid, who I’ve been following for years. A seasoned journalist who frequently contributes to the New York Times and was, for 18 years, a syndicated columnist for the Los Angeles Times, Magid is also the author of a number of books on social media, online safety, and the Internet. His articles and content, always with a strong educational subtext, are also published at CNET, the San Jose Mercury News, and Forbes (among others).

Over dinner recently the parents of a young child spoke about the challenge of moving from the old-fashioned world of a VCR-DVD player and cable into the to the era of streaming video.      Continue reading

Word Order When You Search — It Matters!

The word order of a search matters in today’s connected world, so 21st Century learners — of all ages — should understand how search results change when a user rearranges the words. A short video on word order, uploaded by Google’s Search Anthropologist Daniel Russell – check out his Search-Research blog – teaches this lesson effectively.

Use this less-than-two-minute video, recently featured in a blog post at Free Technology for Teachers, as a quick and succinct teaching tool with students, parents, and other educators.