Young Instagram Users Can Now Embed as Well as Send

InstagramInstagram has announced that users can now get an embed code for any picture, using that code to post an image on a blog or other web page. A July 11, 2013 blog post explains that, instead of sending the picture from one person to another, Instagram users now have a new sharing option —  posting  a picture to a new digital location.

A new share button provides an embed code (essentially a code with specialized HTML), which a user copies and pastes into another site or location (WordPress, Blogger, Tumbler, and others). The picture will then appear on the other blog or website. Young 21st Century learners will probably find some creative ways to use this new feature, and at least a few of them may make instantaneous or embarrassing Instagram decisions.

Continue reading

Wordfoto: Great Fun With Photos and Word Lists

wordfotosunflowers-2

I combined a field of sunflowers with a word list.

I have a new favorite app — Wordfoto. Interestingly, it’s designed for an iPhone and does not yet have a separate iPad version. A GDS student told me about it.

With Wordfoto I create a word list, and then I have some fun turning the words into art by selecting a picture as a background to highlight my words. I can use an image that comes with the app, choose one of the many pictures in my iPhone photo galleries, or take a new picture. It’s even possible to use screen shots. If an image is too cluttered with details, it may not make a good Wordfoto.

When I combine the picture and the word list — voilà! — a cool Wordfoto. Like Instagram, the app comes with a variety of editing options, allowing users to play with the image, crop it, create styles, and fine tune the texture of the pictures. Wordfoto also comes with preset styles that introduce texture, color, and depth variations, making it easy for new users to get started.

Continue reading

SnapChat! Instantly Deletable Images? Well Not Exactly…

Snapchat: the free mobile app that promotes itself as a disappearing act.

snapchat2

Visit the Snapchat site.

Teens and, yes, some tweens are now playing with Snapchat because it’s designed to make pictures disappear at their destination — in ten seconds or less.

I’ve tried to use the app, and pictures really do disappear. Voilà! The content is gone. So does this mean a child (or an adult) can go ahead and send all sorts of pictures?

Well, not exactly. Read A Warning about SnapChat, Teenagers, and Online Photo Sharing, appearing on February 11, 2013 over at the Forbes website.

After downloading and installing the Snapchat app on a mobile phone, a user chooses a picture, text, or drawing and decides how long to allow the a picture to reside on the recipient’s screen — anywhere from 1 to 10 seconds. For Snapchat to work the sender must trust that the recipient will allow the picture to delete and that the recipient will be trustworthy and respect the wishes of the sender. Any user is supposed to be 13 or older.

Continue reading